Git squash merge: non, no, nein, nee, na, nej, não, net

Today I will tell you why you should say no to git squash merges. Even better I will show you. First, I will explain what lead me to write this post. Then, I will provide you with steps to reproduce a problem that seems ignored. A problem that will eventually bite you if you keep using git squash merges. No spoilers until you get there. Hopefully, you will get my point. Since the aim of this post is to save you time in the future or even now this will also be the latest entry of my future-proof series.

Continue reading “Git squash merge: non, no, nein, nee, na, nej, não, net”

Refactoring: break your code fast, fix it faster

everything

About a year ago, I wrote a really short post about failing fast not meaning that we should not think first. Now that I think about it, I don’t believe I was fully in the right. The saying about failing fast was never about not thinking too long. It seems to be about experimenting with what you have in mind. We all have great ideas 24/7, cool software designs, new paradigms to try and so on. The point is to try to make things work in your first try, and the next one and so on. Which makes me think about refactoring.

Continue reading “Refactoring: break your code fast, fix it faster”

Continuous delivery for free using Docker, CircleCI and Heroku

Continuous what?

Continuous delivery. You may recall that in my previous post I announced that today’s entry would be revolving around continuous integration. And technically it can count as such since we will cover continuous integration along the next step. That next step is continuous delivery. If you are not familiar with these terms and the concepts behind them I will sum them up briefly.

Basically, continuous integration allows verifying that your codebase still builds and passes tests passing whenever you push changes. Add a trigger to deploy your code to production upon success and you pretty much have the idea around continuous delivery.

Continue reading “Continuous delivery for free using Docker, CircleCI and Heroku”

.NET Core CLI Tools: Build a web API in 10 minutes

dotnet new everything

This tutorial is an introduction to .NET Core CLI tools. More precisely it is about creating a web API using the CLI tools provided for .NET Core. Whether you are a beginner in development or just new to .NET Core this tutorial is for you. However, you need to be familiar with what an API is and unit tests to fully enjoy this tutorial. Today, we will set up a solution grouping an API project and a test project.

Continue reading “.NET Core CLI Tools: Build a web API in 10 minutes”

HttpResponseSimulator: A simple tool born over an afternoon

What is the HttpResponseSimulator? Apart from being the least original name. Well, it is a tool that allows simulating the behaviour you want from an endpoint to test an HTTP client and/or wrapper. I built it over an afternoon so that I could write a timeout test for an HTTP client wrapper. I had to get familiar with Node.js and Express again, which I previously used to create HappyPostman. Despite the slow start, it took me about a couple of hours to implement and deploy.

Continue reading “HttpResponseSimulator: A simple tool born over an afternoon”