Auto-evaluation and meaningful software

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When I was a kid, when I was asked what I wanted to do I would say Batman or fireman, I am not quite sure if it was the appeal of being some kind of hero or a will to help people. As years passed by I was taught that if I get my A levels I could do whatever it want even football player which I was dreaming about after a couple of nice seasons in my club. But a school rugby game crushed that dream after my ligaments broke during my last year of high school.

After that injury I had time to think about what I would do next, and the first thing that came to my mind was that I like computers, I like the possibilities it gives with the right tools.  You can play games, message people on the other side of the world, see things you can only dream of. At first I thought I would learn software development because it would allow me to create video games that I used to play much more than I do now. That’s how I sent my candidacy to a few schools and universities, got accepted in almost of them then picked Orsay Institute of technology that I entered at 17 and left two years, a run in the Institute office as students representative and a diploma later.

After that I wanted more, I wanted to go more in depth in the IT world, digging into complex software and algorithms, and went for 3 years of engineering at the ESGI in Paris. Those were 3 cool years, I had a lot of fun both in scholar and extra-scholar activities and I learned a lot, especially thanks to the school/work alternate system that got me in the work world before I got on the work market.

On september 2013 I was told by my then CEO at Creova that there was a company that was interested in my skillset in London, he got us in contact and I moved to London for the Lodgeo challenge about a month later. It was certainly the best decision  I could make. I met a lot of great people that had a possitive impact on me both professionally and  personally which makes me pretty happy to be there.

The main thing I learned since I started development is that the designing of a meaningful software is as hard as it is complex, and the implementation can be nightmarish. Actually, the more you try to provide a clear and intuitive user experience the harder it gets. Over the past months I realised that I want to make software development easier for others, make it easier to build nice quality code than rubbish. If coding gets easier, it will enable anyone to focus on designing robust software to solve tomorrow’s problems. I don’t pretend to do it for at a global scale, but at least if it can help the dev next desk or next door I will be happy.

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