Slow CI: real problem or easy excuse for developers?

slow Ci is a lie

When you write software, you can end up in a place where your continuous integration takes too long to execute. For most of the post I will write CI because it’s faster to type. Also it makes your read slightly faster.

When delivering software continuously, the more complex solution, the more you are prone to having a slow CI process at some point. Note that a limited computing power also increases the chances of slow CI becoming your burden.

Continue reading “Slow CI: real problem or easy excuse for developers?”

SQL Views, where the nagger went: a poem by me

Venise sunset by Jean-Dominique Nguele

Before we start

Hey everyone and welcome to the 50th post of this blog. It has been a couple months since I published something. There has been literally tens of drafts about different topics which I didn’t deem worthy of being number 50. Originally I excluded it being a poem until I had that rush of inspiration in Paris tube heading back to my parents after a day out. While listening to music I thought about what bothered me the most this year. It started as a post but ended up a poem written from my phone. A poem about an inappropriate use of SQL views I noticed not so long ago. Despite the essence being drawn from real events there is some dramatization. Why? I hear you think. Well because a poem’s gotta poem at some point. Hope you enjoy.

Continue reading “SQL Views, where the nagger went: a poem by me”

Vectors of trust: Simplify validation for secure transactions

A few weeks ago, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) introduced a new Request For Comments (RFC) document about Vectors of Trust, the RFC8485. It is the work of  Leif Johansson from the Swedish University Network. The original draft went through 15 iterations since 2015 and Justin Richer from Bespoke Engineering edited the current version.

Enough with the credits, what issue the Vectors of trust document is trying to solve? It seems that the purpose is to bring an effective method to measure the trust of credentials for digital transactions. The two main approaches at the moment are known as Level of Assurance (LoA) and Attribute-Based Access Control (ABAC). Let me try to introduce these to you first.

Continue reading “Vectors of trust: Simplify validation for secure transactions”

Hacktoberfest 2018: write 5 pull requests for a free t-shirt

Hello Mishamigos, in a week we will be the last day of October. The day where ghouls and demons will sprout and throw one more spell at us humble coding people. The day where until the last second you will look at your inbox petrified waiting for the next jump scare. As you guessed, in case you were oblivious to the post title, tomorrow is the first day of the last week of Hacktoberfest, 2018 edition.

Continue reading “Hacktoberfest 2018: write 5 pull requests for a free t-shirt”

Git squash merge: non, no, nein, nee, na, nej, não, net

Today I will tell you why you should say no to git squash merges. Even better I will show you. First, I will explain what lead me to write this post. Then, I will provide you with steps to reproduce a problem that seems ignored. A problem that will eventually bite you if you keep using git squash merges. No spoilers until you get there. Hopefully, you will get my point. Since the aim of this post is to save you time in the future or even now this will also be the latest entry of my future-proof series.

Continue reading “Git squash merge: non, no, nein, nee, na, nej, não, net”